Remembering the dead


visiting the family

visiting the family

 

On Hallowe’en (All Hallows’ Eve), in Poland, believers are taught to pray out loud as they walk through the forests in order that the souls of the dead might find comfort; in Spain, Christian priests toll their church bells in order to remind their congregants to remember the dead on All Hallows’ Eve. In Ireland, and among immigrants in Canada, a custom includes the Christian practice of abstinence, keeping All Hallows’ Eve “as a meatless day with pancakes or Callcannon” being served instead. In Mexico, on “All Hallows Eve, the children make a children’s altar to invite the angelitos (spirits of dead children) to come back for a visit.” The Christian Church traditionally observed Hallowe’en through a vigil “when worshippers would prepare themselves with prayers and fasting prior to the feast day itself.” This church service is known as the Vigil of All Hallows or the Vigil of All Saints; an initiative known as Night of Light seeks to further spread the Vigil of All Hallows throughout Christendom. After the service, “suitable festivities and entertainments” often follow, as well as a visit to the graveyard or cemetery, where flowers and candles are often placed in preparation for All Hallows’ Day. In Finland, because so many people visit the cemeteries on All Hallows’ Eve to light votive candles there, they “are known as valomeri, or seas of light.”

My sister and I go to visit the family: father, mother, brother and sister. It’s s day to remember the dead on the day mom was born.
Happy Halloween and have a safe one!

About the photo: lens: canon Rebel Xti, post process with iPodTouch5 App: PhotoToaster

 

 

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3 thoughts on “Remembering the dead

  1. I love your photo and the editing. My daughter’s birthday is the 1st November, today actually. She was born in Austria, which makes this a public holiday and everyone goes to Mass at the graveyard to remember their dead families. An awkward day to celebrate a birth when everyone is thinking of the dead. 😀

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